O'z Ark

Reach For the Sky and Do it NOW

Why You Have Come Here

If you have arrived here seeking sanctity or blessing, then you will have to provide your own cloak and dagger. I only confess to the daily struggle to treat the world with the respect it has earned in my estimation. We all look to the sky and wonder. I feel the whisper of the ages calling and know not what flutter or ripple calls true. My approach is to touch your life in only the manner in which you prefer. As we all must suffer at some time, then I feel we all deserve, also, the right to laugh. My smile is my weapon, and at times my words also I use to defend.

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Saturday, October 24, 2009

Sassafras












A rather insignificant tree on the pond bank all summer, the sassafras seems frail and spindly next to the mighty oaks. However, the fall brings out the best in this tree or shrub. It has 3 different shaped leaves depending on the maturity of the leave and easy to recognize as they appear to be fingers. When you cut a branch open, the distinctive smell, compared to bottled root beer, springs out. The tree spreads in the wild by putting out suckers punching up from the mother tree's root system. The Native Americans used the sassafras from a large number of medicinal purposes by infusing the bark. They would drink the tea to cure diarrhea or used it to relieve pain. You can also make a yellow dye from crushing the wood. The early settlers made a drink from the roots by boiling them with molasses and allowing it to ferment-thus beer from a root or root beer! I've never made anything from the sassafras but have tasted the tea at places like folk festivals and such.
I, of course, appreciate the tree the most in the fall for the gorgeous colors.




2 comments:

troutbirder said...

The reds and yellows are really nice. But the history lesson, of course, is right up my alley. Next time I have a root beer the story will be passed on..

jeanie oliver said...

Oh, that is wonderful. I think that I have told you that I was a history teacher also. I do so love cool little facts like the root beer story. I just finished reading up on your blog's latest posts. thanks for stopping by...
Jeanie